Skin Picking Disorder – Information, Symptoms, Causes, Treatments


skin picking disorder

Skin picking disorder (SPD), also known as dermatillomania, is a skin-picking habit disorder where the skin of the individual with skin picking disorder becomes damaged through repetitive skin picking.

Skin picking disorder often begins in early adulthood and it’s estimated that approximately one to five percent of the population has skin picking disorder. Those diagnosed with skin picking disorder will typically spend at least an hour every day picking at their skin.

Skin Picking Disorder is a mental condition that involves removing skin from the body that leads to skin damage. The skin can either be removed completely or partially and it usually occurs around the face and hands (fingers). Skin picking disorder normally begins at puberty and can persist throughout adulthood.

Symptoms

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Symptoms of skin picking disorder include skin lesions, skin damage, skin infections, and scars. Skin picking disorder is usually caused by stress, anxiety, boredom, or frustration. Symptoms of skin picking disorder can vary but also includes skin bleeding. Skin picking disorder can also cause significant emotional distress, including depression, and shame.

Causes

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There are a number of causes of skin picking disorder that have been identified. These include stress, anxiety, boredom, and feeling of skin imperfections. There is also a genetic component to skin picking disorder as it tends to run in families.

Skin picking disorder is not fully known, but it is believed to be caused by a combination of psychological and environmental factors. Some possible causes include:

Stress: Stress can lead to skin picking as a way to relieve tension.

Anxiety: Anxiety can cause skin picking as a way to cope with stress or fear.

Boredom: Skin picking can help to pass the time, but skin damage may occur.

Frustration: Stress caused by frustration can lead to skin picking in order to relieve tension or calm down.

Certain environments or objects may trigger skin picking. For example, skin picking may occur around skin lesions or dirt.

Skin picking may be a way to cope with negative emotions, such as anxiety or sadness.

Removing skin can provide a sense of control and relief from these negative emotions.

Treatment

There are a number of treatments available for skin picking disorder. These include cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), habit reversal training, and medication. CBT is the most common treatment for skin picking disorder and involves modifying skin picking behaviors. Habit reversal training is based on the premise that skin picking disorder is linked to skin imperfections, which can be avoided by controlling one’s environment.

Treatment for skin picking disorder may involve antidepressant medication and cognitive-behavioral therapy.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy: This type of therapy helps you to change the thoughts and behaviors that may contribute to skin picking.

Antidepressant medication: Antidepressants may help to reduce stress and anxiety that can lead to skin picking.

It is important to seek treatment for skin picking disorder if you are experiencing any symptoms. Treatment can help to reduce skin damage and improve your quality of life.

If skin picking disorder goes untreated, it’s possible for scars to develop that may last a lifetime. Left untreated skin picking disorder can also cause an increased risk of suicide, as skin picking disorder can be very isolating and embarrassing. Treatment for skin picking disorder is available, and it is important to seek help if skin picking disorder becomes a problem in your life.

It is not fully known what causes skin picking disorder, but it is likely caused by a combination of psychological and environmental factors. If you are experiencing any symptoms, it is important to seek treatment. Treatment can help to reduce skin damage and improve your quality of life.

Thank you for reading! If you have any additional questions, please feel free to ask them in the comments section below. We are happy to help!

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